Marc Miller

Handbagged

Handbagged

It’s just a side benefit to an already crackling evening, but if you see Handbagged, the latest in 59E59’s Brits Off Broadway series, you’ll also take in snippets from several current Broadway offerings. The 1981 Irish hunger strikes (The Ferryman)? They’re here. Rupert Murdoch’s takeover of several Brit tabloids, beginning with the Sun in the late ’60s (Ink)? Also here. And The Cher Show may present three different-aged Chers, each commenting on the others, but Handbagged, Moira Buffini’s 2010 play having its New York premiere, makes do with older and younger versions of Queen Elizabeth II and Margaret Thatcher, each interacting with the past and present and occasionally murmuring, “I didn’t say that.”

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Lockdown

Lockdown

The prison drama has a familiar formula: the grizzled veteran nearing parole, the hotheaded younger inmate spoiling for a fight, the wary authorities, the well-meaning outsider taking up the inmates’ cause. The difference with Cori Thomas’ Lockdown is a) it’s Rattlestick Playwrights Theater 2019, not Warner Brothers 1931, and b) it addresses contemporary, unsettling issues about incarceration, social inequity, and what awaits anybody getting out of stir. 

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The Cradle Will Rock

The Cradle Will Rock

You’ve probably heard the story, or maybe you saw the Tim Robbins movie. In 1937, the WPA shut down the Federal Theatre Project’s new “play in music” four days before opening, fearing that its radicalism and pro-union message were just too incendiary. John Houseman (producer), Orson Welles (director), and Marc Blitzstein (author) were determined to put it on somehow. On opening night, forbidden from using the designated theater and lacking an orchestra, they sent an actor out to find a piano. The audience was marched 21 blocks to another, vacant theater somebody else had found. Not allowed to appear onstage, the actors performed from the house, with Blitzstein, the only nonunion performer, playing the score from the stage. The effect was electrifying, and The Cradle Will Rock went on to find other backing and enjoy a successful, conventionally staged run.

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Superhero

Superhero

Superheroes haven’t had an easy time of it in musicals. It’s a Bird … It’s a Plane … It’s Superman opened in 1966 to critical praise but public indifference, and then there was that little show about Spider-Man some seasons back. Add to this unlucky list Superhero at Second Stage, which at least invents its own superheroes rather than sullying the reputations of beloved ones. Further, it’s beautifully produced, assembled by experienced hands (book, John Logan; music and lyrics, Tom Kitt), and possessing several good songs. The trouble is, Superhero isn’t so much written as programmed. 

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Ah, Wilderness!

Ah, Wilderness!

It’s surprising that Ah, Wilderness! doesn’t get done more often. Eugene O’Neill’s only full-length comedy—not, he later said, an autobiography, but a look back at the teen years he wished he’d had—the gentle two-acter is warmhearted, smart about intergenerational conflict, and extremely influential. It’s the template for every stage family comedy from You Can’t Take It With You to Morning’s at Seven and beyond, not to mention countless TV sitcoms, up to and including Modern Family. It rings with universal truths that are easy to identify with, and it’s not hard to stage.

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The Apple Boys

The Apple Boys

Barbershop quartets? What most people know about them is probably limited to The Music Man. Still, they’re jovial company in The Apple Boys, a delightful little musical at the HERE Arts Center, even if they’re not entirely boys. Jack (Jelani Remy), Nathan (Teddy Yudain), Warren (Jonothon Lyons, who wrote the book), and Hank (Amanda Ryan Paige) are turn-of-the-20th-century Coney Islanders, and Jack also happens to be Johnny Appleseed’s grandson. It’s the first in a long line of whimsies, anachronisms, and out-and-out lies that fetchingly tie the loose plot together.

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The Hello Girls

The Hello Girls

It’s been encouraging in the past couple of weeks to visit two new musicals and hear something that so many titles of the past several decades have lacked: real lyrics. That is, words that rhyme, are neat, and contain clever, succinct, and/or expressive ideas. The Prom gave us “dealt/belt,” “alone/Peron,” and “famous/ignoramus,” and all in just one song.

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High Noon

High Noon feature image

With Network and To Kill a Mockingbird just around the corner, it seems like a good time to question the practice of putting classic movies onstage. Can the theater bring any added value to such highly regarded works? Certainly it can reshape them: Network, it seems, will come with a lot of multimedia doodads and whatever else director Ivo van Hove drags into it, and Mockingbird will feature adults in the kids’ roles. Whether those shows will equal the impact they had on the big screen remains to be seen. Meantime, downtown, Axis Company is also having a go at screen-to-stage, with its adaptation of High Noon

Fred Zinnemann’s spare little 1952 Western, most film buffs will tell you, probably should have beaten out The Greatest Show on Earth for Best Picture that year, and it did garner Oscars for actor (Gary Cooper), film editing, scoring, and song. It’s the tense story of a small-town marshal about to be visited by the killer he sent up the river years ago, who’s heading back for revenge and almost sure to succeed. The marshal, having married a sweet Quaker lady that very day, first leaves town, then reconsiders, tries to assemble a bunch of deputies, fails, and is left to face the killer and his cohorts alone. It’s about bravery and resoluteness vs. small-town hypocrisy and avoidance of responsibility, or, as Pauline Kael put it, “The Western form is used for a sneak civics lesson.” 

Phil Gellin (left) and Spencer Aste are townspeople in  High Noon.  Top: Aste, with Jon McCormick (center) as Senator and Brian Barnhart as Marshal Will Barnon.

Phil Gellin (left) and Spencer Aste are townspeople in High Noon. Top: Aste, with Jon McCormick (center) as Senator and Brian Barnhart as Marshal Will Barnon.

At Axis, it also has other things on its mind. The stage, gray and empty and Cinerama-wide, represents the whole town, and in an attention-getting opening, there’s darkness and movie-ish music (Paul Carbonara’s), thundering sound effects (also Carbonara’s) and then, lights up, the entire cast. They’re celebrating the wedding of retiring marshal Will Barnon (Brian Barnhart) and Alice (Katie Rose Summerfield). And from there the script, presumably cobbled together by the whole company (there’s no writer credit), sticks fairly close to Carl Foreman’s original, but with some odd digressions and odder directorial touches.

For some reason, most of the characters’ names, and some of their personalities, have been changed. Harvey, Will’s ornery second-in-command, handsomely played by Lloyd Bridges in the film, is now Senator (Jon McCormick), although not really; this isn’t even a state, but his mother gave him an ambitious name. The hateful hotel clerk is now a hateful bartender (Phil Gillen). The killer’s menacing brother has become a giggly half-wit (Nicholas McGovern). And Alice, in conversation with Helen Ramirez (Britt Genelin), Will’s former mistress and now Harvey/Senator’s squeeze, confides in her, “I’m a feminist,” surely not a term heard much in the Old West. 

Beyond the adjustments in plot and characterization, and there are several, director Randy Sharp has reconceived the material as something of an existentialist nightmare. The townspeople often fade, dreamlike, into the background, but act as one; when Alice declares, “I don’t care who’s right or wrong,” they all suddenly look at her, as if to emphasize the town’s collective guilt. When Helen offers a speech, not in the movie, about her awful marriage, Alice inexplicably waltzes around. And while the town debates the value of fighting or not fighting, what’s Helen doing lying on the floor, waving her arms?  

Britt Genelin (left) as Helen Ramirez and McCormick. Photographs by Pavel Antonov.

Britt Genelin (left) as Helen Ramirez and McCormick. Photographs by Pavel Antonov.

Anyway, some of the staging’s effective, especially in its isolation of Will from everyone else. Barnhart, while not very Gary Cooper–like, cuts a striking figure. He seldom looks at anyone even while talking to them; he’s a loner, a sole force of heroism among cowards, and he suffers for it. As potential deputies fade away one by one, he agonizes, and we feel his helplessness and fear the showdown. 

Only there ain’t no showdown. Spoiler, but it’s unavoidable: The narrative ends before that dreaded train pulls in, and we’re denied not only the film’s taut editing and crisp cinematography as the shooting starts, but any denouement at all. The 85-minute film was praised for taking place in real time; this is over in an hour. Sharp and company do zero in on moral conflict—is Will really heroic for reviving old trouble? Is the town really wrong to want to push it away? Interesting questions, though they go unanswered. Some good acting happens, notably by Summerfield and Genelin, and there’s also expressive lighting (David Zeffren) and eye-filling costumes (Karl Ruckdeschel). In short, this High Noon makes a reasonable case for reinvestigating and reinterpreting beloved old movies. But be advised, it’s missing a couple of reels.

High Noon plays through Oct. 27 at Axis Company (1 Sheridan Square). Performances are at 8 p.m. Oct. 36, 813, 1820, and 2427. For tickets, call Theatermania (212-352-3101) or visit axiscompany.org.

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Experimenting with Katz

Experimenting with Katz

It’s getting a little late in the day for a contemporary coming-out comedy. Isn’t that battle pretty much over, and aren’t plays like Gemini and Torch Song Trilogy period pieces by now? That said, David Adam Gill gets a fair amount of comic mileage out of Experimenting with Katz, his “new comedic play” about, shades of Albert Innaurato or Harvey Fierstein, Michael Katz (Paul Pakler), a youngish gay man with self-esteem issues, romantic issues, and severe mother issues. Gill hasn’t quite merged his characters and themes into a cohesive whole, and he needs to acquaint himself with the Delete key—Katz, small as it is, runs more than 2½ hours. But he knows how to make us laugh, and, a few contrivances notwithstanding, care a little, too. 

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On a Clear Day You Can See Forever

On a Clear Day You Can See Forever

Was Daisy Gamble, the leading character of On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, ever reincarnated as much as the Alan Jay Lerner-Burton Lane musical-comedy-operetta itself? In the show, about paranormal activity and past lives, Daisy’s seeming prior existence as a Regency beauty fascinates one Dr. Mark Bruckner, an analyst who believes in previous lives and ESP.

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Koalas Are Dicks

Koalas Are Dicks

Popular culture lately seems overrun with talking animals. The funny-sad Netflix series BoJack Horseman stars a talking horse, backed by a talking dog, a talking cat, and a supporting talking menagerie. The movie Ted a few years back had Mark Wahlberg’s teddy bear coming to life. And let’s not even get started on Pixar.

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Fire and Air

Fire and Air

It’s some feast that Terrence McNally has cooked up for Douglas Hodge, fulminating and relishing every minute as the tortured, torturing ballet impresario Sergei Diaghilev in Fire and Air, a premiere at Classic Stage Company. McNally has always been fond of larger-than-life personalities gesticulating wildly and playing to the wings—think Master Class, The Lisbon Traviata, It’s Only a Play. He has often toiled in the opera realm, addicted to its outsize theatricality and the strong feelings its fans and its creators harbor. With Fire and Air he switches to ballet, specifically the Ballets Russes on the eve of revolution—an art where those qualities also abound. The author is 79, he has written plays for more than half a century, and Fire and Air is vintage McNally.

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Muswell Hill

Muswell Hill

A pot of monkfish stew sits on the stove for most of Muswell Hill, Torben Betts’s barbed comedy—simmering, bubbling, issuing forth its varied flavors gradually and subtly. As does Muswell Hill. Set in 2010 in the titular leafy upscale London suburb—the equivalent of, say, Saddle River on this side of the pond—Betts’s work presents a troubled dinner party of mismatched individuals and couples, talking past and misunderstanding one another, drinking too much even though at least two begin as teetotalers, letting their libidos lead them to unwise decisions, and revealing personality traits simultaneously unexpected and inevitable. We’re in what seems familiar Alan Ayckbourn territory for much of it, then the hurts and regrets pile up, and the curtain falls on a very funny comedy that has also become a sad commentary on human foibles.

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Tomorrow in the Battle

Tomorrow in the Battle

Curious title, Tomorrow in the Battle. It’s a phrase from Richard III (Act V, scene 3), the partial title of a well-reviewed 1994 novel by Spanish writer Javier Marías, and apparently the English translation of a German war cry. And what it has to do with what’s happening on Ars Nova’s stage, heaven knows. At any rate, to enjoy Kieron Barry’s drama, you’d better love London: there’s a lot of it here. And you’d better have a tolerance for shaky British accents. Patrick Hamilton, as our not-altogether-heroic hero, can’t decide whether to pronounce it “again” or “a gain”; he keeps going back and forth. And Ruth Sullivan and Allison Threadgold, as the women in his life, flatten or broaden their vowels as they see fit, not always consistently.   

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Curvy Widow

Curvy Widow

First, we love Nancy Opel. The frisky singing comedienne all but stole Honeymoon in Vegas from Rob McClure, which can’t have been easy. Her Yente considerably enlivened the goyische Alfred Molina revival of Fiddler on the Roof, and her Dickensian Penelope Pennywise was one of the few enjoyable things about Urinetown. She surely deserves a musical of her own. And she deserves a better one than Curvy Widow.

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Money Talks

Money Talks

This is the guy who wrote Anna Karenina? Librettist-lyricist Peter Kellogg, perhaps less than happy with the memories of that short-lived 1992 Broadway musical, has turned about as far away from tragic romance as it is possible to turn for his new project. Picture this: a small, whimsical Off-Broadway musical—a book show, but with a loose narrative allowing for plenty of sketchlike comedy, and with a structure borrowed freely from Arthur Schnitzler’s La Ronde. A little social comment, but broad characters and an overriding silliness that induces, if not a lot of guffaws, a fair number of smiles. Music by David Friedman, best known for the great cabaret song “My Simple Christmas Wish” and several syrupy ballads that were gracefully sung by the late Nancy Lamott. Hence, Money Talks.  

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Attack of the Elvis Impersonators

Attack of the Elvis Impersonators

Attack of the Elvis Impersonators, at the Lion, has no subtitle, so here’s a helpful suggestion: The Attention Deficit Disorder Musical. Lory Lazarus, who perpetrated book, music, and lyrics, just staggers from premise to premise, seizing on some new plot point and leaving whole subplots behind to die of malnutrition. Some of them contain good ideas. More don’t.

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Zero Hour

Zero Hour

Zero’s back in town, and the town is jollier for it. That’s Zero as in Mostel, in the ursine form of Jim Brochu, who has brought his one-man biographical show, Zero Hour, back to the Theatre at St. Clement’s. It won him a Drama Desk Award back in 2010, and in this new incarnation, if anything, the author and star is more formidable, more unpredictable, more voluble—more Zero.

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Marry Harry

Marry Harry

Marry Harry revives a genre not much seen in these parts lately, the charm musical. The work of Jennifer Robbins (book), Dan Martin (music), and Michael Biello (lyrics), the show is small and hasn’t much on its mind, just the urge to put a few likable characters through a simple story and send its audience out with a collective feeling of “Aww.” Thanks to an attractive production on the intimate York Theatre stage and an overqualified cast, it gets its “Aww,” though it also earns a couple of orders of “You can’t be serious.”

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Dead End

Dead End

Remember the Dead End Kids? Possibly not, unless you’re a student of B-movie genres or a Turner Classic Movies junkie. But the kids, led by Billy Halop, Leo Gorcey, Huntz Hall, and Gabriel Dell, enjoyed a film career starting in the Depression—cracking wise, getting into scraps, peddling broad Noo Yawk accents, and challenging authority. The kids prospered at several studios, well into the 1950s and long past being kids. To many a moviegoer in flyover states, the Dead End Kids were New York.

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